Jul 13 2010

Sunny San Diego . . . .

Published by under Boats,The Adventure,Wylie 39

The last few legs were pretty amazing–the stretch from Turtle Bay to San Diego was filled with adventure, some really beautiful anchorages–and, some long miles. I will be posting more details of the trip in the next few days.

As for right now, I am in San Diego at the Transient Slips adjacent to the SD Police Docks. The sunshine has finally come out, and I am in the midst of all of the chandleries, harbors, marinas, and yacht clubs of San Diego. It is pretty amazing! (I even scored a ride on a Tripp 40 for the Wednesday night beer can races).

I’ll be here for a few more days to finish the repairs to Marishanna, and then I’ll be back at sea for the remaining legs to San Francisco. In the meantime, I have an internet connection and some work to finish . . . .

No responses yet

Jan 22 2010

Marishanna has a clean bottom . . . .

Published by under Boat Maintenance,Wylie 39

Marishanna and her clean bottom . . . though you cannot see it You may not be able to tell, but Marishanna has a clean bottom.  I have been keeping fairly current with it–scrubbing the waterline, and softly sponging the underwater paint, but the other day, I noticed that there was only one zinc left on the prop shaft, and that it was nearly gone.  So, I hired a diver to come out and professionally clean the bottom of Marishanna, replace the zincs, and even coughed up a bit extra to have him scrub the bottom of the dinghy.

Zincs are metal attached to the boat that is lower on the chart of elements that all the other metals on-board.  If you have an electrical system, you have magnetic fields, and when you mix a magnetic field with sea water, it needs some place to go.  On boats, you put zincs and give this process something “to eat”–so, that the process will leave your brass, stainless steel, and other metals alone.  It is sort of a boat owner’s offering, if you will.

Once they are gone, your boat vitals are eroding (like the thru-hulls can be made of metal).  So, it is important to keep them replaced and current.  And, Marishanna’s zincs have been renewed–a fresh offering to the god of electrolysis.

Note: They really call them “Sacrificial Anodes

No responses yet